10/25/2020 – Run

Another Goggins Challenge

Run & Push ups

  • 7:16 am, SG 158, Start Walk
  • 7:30 am, SG 159, End Walk
  • 8:45 am, SG 113, Start Challenge
    • 0.5 Mile Run, 5g carb
    • 25 Push Ups
    • 0.5 Mile Run (1 Mile total)
    • 25 Push Ups (50 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (1.5 Miles total)
    • 25 Push Ups (75 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (2 Miles total)
    • 25 Push Ups (100 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (2.5 Miles total)
    • 25 Push Ups (125 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (3 Miles total)
    • 25 Push Ups (150 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (3.5 Miles total), 4g carb
    • 25 Push Ups (175 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (4 Miles total), 4g carb
    • 25 Push Ups (200 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (4.5 Miles total), 8g carb
    • 25 Push Ups (225 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (5 Miles total)
    • 25 Push Ups (250 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (5.5 Miles total)
    • 25 Push Ups (275 Push Ups total)
    • 0.5 Mile Run (6 Miles total), 0.4 U pre-bolus
    • 25 Push Ups (300 Push Ups total)
  • 10:15 am, SG: 90, End Challenge
    • 400 meter “just to air it out”
  • 10:17 am, SG: 90, End Run
    • 10:30 am, SG: 87, 2g carb
  • 10:50 am, SG 91, 30 Minutes Post Workout

There are few things that get me more excited to workout than a good challenge. Historically, I’ve used races as my motivation to keep up with my training and fitness but with the current state of the world, I’ve been resorting to other kinds of challenges. Earlier this week, Marty suggested that we try David Goggins‘ run-push up-run challenge. The workout is a 6-mile run, however each time you complete half a mile, you stop and do 25 push ups. That’s a total of 300 push ups by the time you finish all 6 miles. Additionally, you have to run each mile 10 seconds faster than the previous mile. I just can’t help myself so today we went to the track to give it a shot.

I was so excited when we got to the track, I completely forgot to check my blood sugar before we started the first half mile. Earlier in the morning, the Dawn Phenomenon had me running a bit high (but still in normal range). I took Miles for a walk which knocked it down a bit but I was still hanging in the 150 range. I wasn’t really concerned about creeping a bit higher or lower before my run since I knew the run could bring it back down or I could boost it with some carbs. After the first half mile, I realized my basal had finally started to bring me back down and I would need some carbs to sustain the rest of the workout.

At mile 3, I saw I was trending down again and thought to myself, okay more carbs after the push ups. Again, I got so wrapped up in the challenge and the pacing that I started my next half mile before I ate. Whoops! I should have stopped for carbs after I realized but I thought ‘it’s only a half mile, I’ll fix it after’. I had some carbs at 3.5 and 4 but it wasn’t soon enough and I ended up dropping down to 60 before it started to come back up and level out. That is the hardest thing about running with diabetes in my opinion, it’s easy to forget to keep monitoring it when you find yourself in a run induced flow state. Luckily, this time I caught it quickly (and before I was actually low) and was only low (below 70) for about 5 minutes or so.

The running itself wasn’t bad at all for me, which probably means I should have started at a faster pace. Today, it was the push ups that became really challenging by the end. Of course, Marty kept me honest. He started to put his fist under my chest and told me to make sure I was tapping it on each rep to ensure I was doing the full movement and not “cheating” on the reps. He is lucky I love him! 😉 After we finished, Marty suggested doing one more lap, just to air it out and get the legs turning over quickly. I figured, ‘why not’ so we tacked on an extra lap. All in all we had a blast and got in a workout that I’m sure my pecs will be sore from tomorrow.

Let me know if you try this workout in the comments or if you have any suggestions for future workout challenges! Happy Sunday Diabuddies! Stay Strong!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

Published by Jenny Nat

https://t1-athlete.training/about/

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