T1 Endurance Training Strategy

Endurance training is my personal favorite kind of exercise and if you follow my blog, you’ll see that the majority of my workouts are some type of long form cardio. There is just nothing quite like finding a rhythm and getting lost in your thoughts, lost in the woods or letting your mind go completely blank. It’s meditative and relaxing and has become a bit of an addiction for me*. I tell everyone that I run for my mind more than my body and that I would indeed be a crazy person if it weren’t for running. 

When I was first diagnosed, one of the first things that crossed my mind was ‘How do I get back to running?’. So I did a lot of experimenting early on to figure out what I needed to do to regain and keep up my running habit. This is what typically works for me for long steady cardio, keeping in mind that…

Typically, endurance training will lower my blood sugar and often lower it significantly.

Usually**, I reduce my basal insulin 30-90 minutes before I start an endurance workout and end it 10-30 minutes before I stop working out. For a 60 minute run, for example, I might reduce basal 30 minutes in advance and end it halfway through the run. The idea here is that my insulin usually takes 30 minutes to start taking effect so I want it to stop lowering blood sugar on my run and start kicking in again once I stop. The exact timing will vary from person to person (and possibly day to day) and will depend on what kind of insulin you’re on. 

I also make sure to “carb up” during my workout. The worst thing that can happen is that your blood sugar will drop low so I always carry carbs for endurance workouts. I will typically not focus as much on the number on my GCM as much as I pay attention to the trend. If I’m trending up, maybe I need more insulin. If I’m trending down, I probably need some carbs. I’ll usually have a few carbs at a time and check every 10-20 minutes or so to see how they are effecting my sugars. If you consider that high glycemic index carbs that are typically used for endurance training will take roughly 15 minutes to actually hit your system, you can avoid overdoing it by spacing out the timing a bit. Again this will vary from person to person so adjust this timing to how you know that carbs affect you. 

I avoid insulin onboard at all costs. If this means I can’t eat and/or inject for four hours (the amount of time my insulin lasts in my system) before an evening workout, I try my best to make that happen. Having active insulin in your system and adding cardio will drop most people’s blood sugar extremely fast and will require a lot more carbs to keep BGs within a safe range. This causes a lot of frustration for newer T1 athletes because they wonder, ‘What is the point of working out when I’m eating all of the calories I’m burning?’. While this is oversimplified and working out has many other health benefits, it is helpful to understand that if you have less insulin in your system, you won’t need as much food to keep BGs in a healthy range. 

On that note, be aware of protein and fat. Learn how they affect your BGs and use them strategically. You can use the delayed effect of these macro-nutrients to keep BGs steady during endurance training or they can spike your BGs way high before or after a workout if you don’t time it right. This will take some self-experimentation to figure out exactly how it will affect you and how much/what kind of protein you need to keep BGs stable. 

Keep in mind other things that can affect your BGs such as hormones for women, alcohol up to 24 hours before, the dawn phenomenon and race day adrenaline. If your BGs aren’t doing what you would expect, be ready to adapt and err on the side of going high. It’s safer to be high than low and you can always bring it back down with a little insulin later on, if needed. I have been known to over correct an oncoming low with food mid-run and then inject insulin for it towards the end of my run or right when I finish to avoid going high. 

These are my general rules of thumb but again, the most important thing is to be flexible and adjust as needed. You can cut a workout short if you’re going low or extend it if you’re trending high (and have the time to do so). You can eat more or less and adjust insulin levels to stay in range. Play with the variables and find out what works best for you!

Endurance training isn’t for everyone and there are plenty of ways to stay active if you hate it. Really the best workout is the one you will do consistently! More to come in a future post on BG management strategies for other types of workouts!

*Yes, I mean this literally. More on this here. There is also a beautifully written section in Running with Sherman that talks about this topic.

**If I’m running in the morning and anticipate the dawn phenomenon spiking my BGs high, I usually don’t reduce basal at all. You may or may not be able to get away with this depending on how the dawn phenomenon affects you. 

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/28/2020-Run/Intervals

Outdoor Run

Fartlek

  • 5:56 am, BG: 169, Start run
    • 2g carb towards the end of the run
  • 6:28 am, BG: 128, End run
  • 6:35 am, BG: 125, 1.1 U pre-bolus, Exit automode
  • 6:58 am, BG: 111, 30 Minutes Post Workout

This morning, I woke up to a pump alarm at 4:45 am. I had intended to get up around 5:30 am but diabetes never sleeps. I was upset to see 177 on my pump but a quick blood test showed I was actually 168. Usually, since the CGM lags behind the pump about 15 mins, that would mean my BG is trending down. I didn’t want active insulin onboard for my run in an hour so I didn’t correct, went back to bed and let automode do it’s thing.

When I tested again pre-run at 5:48 am the CGM was reading 168 and my BG was 177. I yelled to Marty, “177, we have to go now if you’re coming!” and he followed me out the door. My CGM never read out of range on the run but it was definitely borderline today and way higher than I like it. Towards the end of the run, I dropped from 166 to 138 in 10 minutes. On my pump/CGM when I start to see drops that quick, the number shows with an arrow down. I knew since my BGs had been so high, automode had been giving me a bit of extra basal to help bring it down so I ate one gummy to slow that drop down and prevent a low later. Once I got home, I pre-bolused for breakfast because I wanted something with a bit more carbohydrates than my typical breakfast* Whenever I have something like this that I know is going to spike my BGs quickly, I try to pre-bolus and then consume my meal slowly** so the carbs hit at the same time as the insulin.

Just like last Thursday, Marty came with me on the run and gave me the interval pick ups. He says, ‘It’s the only time he gets to boss me around” so he always enjoys it. I really did too! It didn’t hurt that I felt faster today (and my Garmin agreed)! There is also something about warm, rainy days, they always seem to be good running days for me. I was actually surprised at how good I felt this morning since I did one of the free live OTF zoom sessions yesterday. I really thought my legs would feel like cement but that’s why you get out and do it everyday, a lot of times, you can surprise yourself!

*Since I’ve been getting a lot of questions about what I eat, this morning I had a smoothie. Normally I’m not a big smoothie person but today I was craving blueberries so I went for it. I threw 1/2 c frozen blueberries, 10g unflavored collagen protein, 14g vanilla protein powder/probiotic mix, 1/2 tsp L-glutamine, 1/2 tsp cinnamon and 1 c unflavored almond milk all in a blender. It ended up being about 164 calories with 12g carb, 3g fat and 22g protein. Sometimes I sneak some fresh spinach in there too but I forgot it this morning.

**One of my diabuddies mentioned using this strategy when she was pregnant to keep BGs as stable as possible. Her method was pre-bolus, eat 75% of her meal, wait a bit and then eat the other 25% if you want to get technical. I’m not personally pregnant or trying to have kids but I’m certainly open to any strategies to achieve normal blood sugars and optimal health. I’ve also found that this strategy helps me realize when I’m full (before I overeat) and the slow mindful approach allows me to enjoy my meals more. Primarily, food is fuel but that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy it too!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/25/2020-Murph

Memorial Day

Murph WOD

  • 10:53 am, BG: 131, Start 1 mile run
  • 11:03 am, BG: 128, Start 100 pull-ups
  • 11:26 am, BG: 91, Start 200 push ups, 3 gummies
  • 11:49 am, BG: 88, Start 300 squats
  • 12:00 pm, BG: 97, Start 1 mile run
  • 12:08 pm, BG: 102, End run
  • 12:38 pm, BG: 108, 30 Minutes Post Workout

Today in honor of all who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom, I did the “Murph” workout. This is one of the Crossfit Hero WODs and it honors Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, who was killed in Afghanistan June 28th, 2005. Although, I haven’t done Crossfit in years, I love the challenge and sentiment of this workout. It was my first time attempting it so I was admittedly a bit nervous to give it a shot.

Marty did it with me but started a bit ahead of me since we only have one pull up bar. He crushed it (as expected) and I finished a few minutes later. Okay, maybe it was more than “a few” minutes. Crossfit purists will tell you that “Murph” is to be done with a weighted vest but I was just happy to finish more pull ups and push ups then I’ve ever done in a single day, let alone a single workout. The squats were even harder than I thought they would be and running after them reminded me of how you feel transitioning from the bike to the run in a triathlon. Overall, this was a good one. I see why Murph liked it so much and I’ll definitely be feeling it tomorrow!

My BG management was okay today. I started a bit high and had the tail end of my breakfast insulin active when I started. I wasn’t 100% sure if the short runs or the anxiety of trying something new would spike my BGs before I started, so I didn’t reduce my basal before hand and didn’t eat anything until I started the push ups. I wasn’t trusting my sensor completely, so I checked with a blood test and got a unicorn at 85 which was fun. At that point, I had dropped enough that I knew I would need something for the squats and second run. After I was done, my BGs leveled out nicely right around 100. Now, off to celebrate the holiday with my favorites!

Thank you to the service members and their family members, who have sacrificed for our country.

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/24/2020-Run + Yoga + Core

Abs +

Shake out + Stretch

  • 8:26 am, BG: 124, Start ab block
  • 8:56 am, BG: 114, Finish ab block
  • 9:27 am, BG: 107, Start run, 4g carbs
  • 9:57 am, BG: 134, End run
  • 10:04 am, BG: 132, Start yoga
  • 10:26 am, BG: 100, End yoga
  • 10:56 am, BG: 90, 30 Minutes Post Workout

This morning, I had a 30 minute shake out run on my schedule. I also had a strength day but I have something fun planned for tomorrow so I decided to skip that and do some abs and yoga instead. When I workout, I always try to have a training schedule but I’m always willing to adjust it to include something fun. The fun things help keep it interesting and keep me motivated!

The best exercise, is the one you will do consistently, so you might as well do something you enjoy!

I started with the abs today while Marty went for his run, then we did my shake out run together and I finished up with the same yoga for runners video* that I’ve been doing most of the week. The ab set was rough, the run felt great (finally starting to break in the new shoes) and I’m actually starting to see some progress with my yoga already.

My BG management worked out nicely this morning. I was trying to figure out what to eat before my run and landed on my flavored PB co peanut butter. I’ve never used it pre-run before but since today was just an easy 30 min run, I figured, why not test it out. In non-running circumstances when I eat it, I spike high quickly and then drop quickly. It is pretty low carb so the spike is only usually 20-30 points and it doesn’t kick me out of range. It worked well keeping my BGs up on my short run and you can see the drop during yoga. I probably won’t make this a habit since I wouldn’t want that drop to happen on the run but it worked well today.

What fun workouts do you have planned for the holiday weekend?

*Check it out here if you like.

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/23/2020-Run

Outdoor Run

LSD

  • 8:00 am, BG: 137, Breakfast, 0 carbs, 12g fat, 31g protein, 1.2 U insulin
  • 8:40 am, BG: 141, 1.8 U insulin
  • 11:08 am, BG: 97, Start temp target
  • 12:29 pm, BG: 88, Start run, ~8g carbs throughout
  • 2:17 pm, BG: 84, End run, End temp target
  • 2:42 pm, BG: 100, Automode exit
  • 2:47 am, BG: 100, 30 Minutes Post Workout

I had originally planned to run in the morning today but I decided to sleep in instead. I’m so glad I did, I really needed it today. I also had plans to social distance and have tea with my mom this morning so I decided an afternoon run was in order. I decided to have a small breakfast of chicken sausage and protein coffee at 8 am. I dosed for part of the protein as a ate and then the rest about 40 minutes later*. You can see this gave me a nice steady decline into my ideal range and most of the active insulin was out of my system before I started my run. I should also mention that I was slowly sipping on black coffee most of the morning. I’ve found that it actually has very little effect on my BGs, possibly because I’ve been a serious coffee/caffeine addict since I was in college. Many T1Ds report a serious spike from black coffee so if it impacts your BGs, factor that into your pre-workout planning.

Roughly 90 minutes before my run, I started my temp target. I did a longer temp target because I was planning on a longer run and my BG was in perfect range and had some room to climb, if needed. During the run, I took a few swigs of tailwind for my carbs. Since I started with a pretty low blood sugar for a run, I had the biggest gulp right as I started and nothing at all for the last 3 miles. You can see I landed at a great place post run but I did start to rise pretty quickly in the 30 minutes after so I probably should have ended my temp target earlier. Since I was hanging in the 80s, I left the reduced basal on until I was actually done, just to be on the safe side.

The run itself was really nice. It’s been a while since I’ve done a LSD so it was good to just chill out and go. It rained this morning so the trails were wet and muddy. The air was a little humid and temps were in the low 70s so I was sweating like crazy. It’s starting to feel like summer for sure! Since all of the flowers are starting to bloom the woods were so fragrant. The creek had swelled from the rain and I swear it’s just mesmerizing to glance over and see the raging water rushing by.

My legs felt okay today, not great but not horrible. I was a bit in my head early in the run but by mile 4, I thought, “Let it go and just run.” I stopped focusing on my pace and just let myself have fun. The later miles are always my favorites. If you don’t like to run, I always recommend slowing down the pace and going a bit longer. It allows you to relax and enjoy it a bit more. Who knows, maybe you’ll experience the elusive runners high!

*When I dose for protein, I take my pump out of automode. Sometimes, like this morning, I put it right back in automode. Other times, I won’t dose as much upfront and I leave it in manual mode with an increased basal. Since I knew I was going to run this afternoon, I didn’t want to increase my basal and have some of it hitting on my run and dropping my BGs too low. Having some protein and fat in my system also helped to “slow things down” and keep my BGs steady today.

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Peanut Butter Banana Bread

Low Carb PB Banana Bread

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 TBSP Almond milk
  • 1 tsp Lemon juice
  • 1 c Almond Flour
  • ⅓ c Flavored Pb Co – Banana Nut Bread powder (32 grams)
  • 2 TBSP Swerve (or sweetener of choice)
  • 2 TBSP Cinnamon
  • 1 tsp Baking powder
  • 1 tsp Salt (optional)
  • ½ tsp Xantham gum
  • 3 Eggs, separated
  • 1 1/2 tsp Banana extract
  • 1 tsp Butter flavor extract
  • 1/4 c Almond milk
  • ¼ c Walnuts (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a 9×5 inch loaf pan with parchment paper, so that the paper hangs over two opposite sides (for easy removal later).
  2. In a medium bowl, add lemon juice to almond milk. Set aside for at least 10 minutes and then stir so it thickens (similar to buttermilk).
  3. In a separate large bowl, mix together the almond flour, banana nut bread powder, xantham gum, baking powder, swerve, cinnamon, and salt (if using).
  4. Mix the egg yolks, banana and butter flavor into the almond “buttermilk” mixture.
  5. Pour the dry ingredients into the wet and combine. Add 1/4 c almond milk and mix thoroughly. Beat on low setting with a mixer until a dough/batter forms. Add half the walnuts, if using.
  6. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until the form stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites into the batter gently until fully combined.
  7. Transfer the batter into the lined loaf pan and press evenly to make a smooth top. Optional, sprinkle the top with chopped walnuts and press them lightly into the surface.
  8. Bake for 50-60 minutes, until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  9. Cool completely before removing from the pan and slicing. (The longer you let it sit before slicing, the better it will hold together. The next day is ideal, if you can wait that long.) Enjoy!

Notes:

You can use any other nuts in this recipe or add in sugar free chocolate chips (like Lily’s). A pinch of nutmeg could also be added. If you don’t have a loaf pan, you can also distribute the batter in a muffin tin. We like to enjoy our banana bread with Banana Foster flavored coffee from Ocean City Coffee.

Nutrition:

1/8 of the loaf has roughly 94 calories, 6g carbs, 6.7g fat and 4.3g protein. This is an estimate and based off my entry of the ingredients into My Fitness Pal and includes the walnuts in the calculation.

Looking for more recipes? Check out my T1 Recipe page here!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/22/2020-Yoga + Walk

Active Recovery/

Movement

  • 6:11 am, BG: 133, Start yoga, 0 carbs, 2.5g fat, 6g protein, 0.3 U insulin
  • 6:40 am, BG: 129, End yoga
  • 6:50 am, BG: 128, Start walk
  • 7:09 am, BG: 124, End walk
  • 7:36 am, BG: 120, 30 Minutes Post Walk

Today is an active recovery day for me and I wasn’t originally going to write about it because it didn’t “feel” like a workout. Then I started to think about the beginning of my T1 journey and remembered that what is an active recovery day today, would have been an extremely challenging workout for me at that time in my life.

By the time I was diagnosed, my body was in DKA and starving because it couldn’t process sugar properly. To survive, it started eating away at my muscle for fuel*. By the time I realized I needed to go to the hospital, I was so weak that I couldn’t walk from my bed to my bedroom door without sitting down to take a break. After they told me I was diabetic, while I was still in the hospital, I remember struggling to walk a single slow lap around the small Intensive Care Unit.

We all have to start (or restart) somewhere. If you’re at the beginning of your journey (in diabetes, working out, or both) this one is for you!

Today I decided to continue with my stretching and mobility work so I did this gentle 30 minute yoga video. It had a lot of movements that stretched the hamstrings and mine are always tight**. After yoga, we took Miles for a quick walk and ran with him around our neighborhood park. You’ll notice that even though it felt like “minimal effort” to me, that little bit of movement still burned about 100 calories. I also felt more energized and relaxed by the time I started working. It really doesn’t take much to begin to feel the benefits of exercise and every little bit helps!

For my blood sugar management, I didn’t do too much. I had a small snack with no carbs, 2.5g of fat and 6g of protein just before I started doing yoga and gave myself a 0.3 U dose for the protein. This did a couple of things. First, sometimes a small snack is enough to signal your liver that you don’t need it to dump sugar into your blood stream and is enough to fend off the dawn phenomenon. Second, the protein and fat kept my blood sugar steady 40 minutes later on our walk. The small insulin correction also helped prevent a delayed protein spike***. Overall, my BG ended up being very stable although it was at the top of my personal target range. Can’t complain about a flat line in range though!

*I was down to 105 lbs, pretty under weight for my small 5’3″ frame. Now, I usually hang around 125 lbs to give you a point of reference.

**If you do a lot of sitting (at a desk or in a car for example), your hamstrings are in a shortened position frequently and may become tight. This can cause lower back pain, among other issues. If you’re having lower back pain, try stretching your hamstrings out, you may find it helps.

***When I dose for protein, usually I take 50-60% of the amount that I would if I was dosing for the same amount of carbs. So if I eat 6g of carb, I’ll typically take 0.6 U and if I eat 6g of protein, I’ll take 0.3 U. Timing matters too! I generally pre-bolus 20-40 minutes for carbs but bolus as I start to eat or after I eat for protein. Self experimentation is needed to find out what will work for you. This is definitely something to discuss with a medical professional!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/21/2020-Run + Yoga

Side street strides

+ Stretch

  • 2:51 am, BG: 95, Start 90 min temp target
  • 6:14 am, BG: 122, Start run
  • 6:47 am, BG: 107, End run
  • 6:54 am, BG: 90, Start yoga
    • 1g carb towards the end
  • 7:15 am, BG: 82, End yoga
  • 7:46 am, BG: 95, 30 Minutes Post Workout

This morning, I had intervals on my running schedule so we did a fartlek session. I hate running intervals but I’ve come to learn it is a necessary evil. Marty came with me and gave me the pick ups. He would randomly say, “That stop sign” or “That basketball net” and it would be my job to pick up the pace until I hit the designated spot. I’m not going to lie, I hate these kinds of workouts because I’m not in control and I don’t know what’s coming ahead of time. Normally, I can talk myself through a workout in my mind by telling myself things like “half way there” or “just another 5k, you can run a 5k in your sleep”. Workouts like today, you don’t know when the next pick up is or when it’s going to end so it’s much more mentally challenging.

After the run, I did the same post run yoga session*. I’ve been really good about practicing every day this week, using the 20 min video on days where I focus on other types of workouts and longer sessions if yoga is the focus. Yesterday, I only did a 2 mile shake out run so Marty and I did this video (60 mins) as well.

I had originally intended to share yesterday’s workouts with you all, but I had some sensor issues and had to workout “blind”** which meant I didn’t have my pretty data and lines to share. I just based what I did off of how I felt. It was good to be actively mindful about how my blood sugar was making me feel. Knowing if you’re high, low or just right without a CGM is a great skill to practice since technology is bound to fail from time to time.

My BG management worked out pretty well again this morning. You might notice that I tried out a slightly different strategy today. I woke up just before 3:00 am this morning (completely randomly) so, trying to be a “good diabetic”*** I decided to test my blood sugar. It was 95, which is fantastic, except when I remembered I would be running 2-3 hours later. I thought about it and decided to set a temp target for 90 minutes. That would allow my blood sugar to rise a bit in the short term and hopefully help on my run too. Since my insulin is at peak strength about two hours after it’s injected, the peak strength (or lack there of) of my reduced basal should’ve hit during the run.

It worked great! My numbers were super steady this morning on the run. They did start to drop after, around 6:45 am which makes sense because my basal started normal strength again around 4:35 am****. Normally in my mind, I think more about when insulin will start to hit my system but perhaps I should be putting more weight in considering when it will be peaking. I don’t know if I’ll keep getting up that early but it’s definitely something to keep in mind.

After the run, toward the end of my yoga session, I noticed I was dropping quicker than I would like so I had a single jelly bean to prevent a low. I didn’t want to have too many carbs and spike my BGs high before breakfast since I generally try to be in the lower end of normal range and/or trending down prior to eating. All’s well that ends well though so overall grateful for a decent workout and sugars today!

*Check it out here if you like.

**My sensor failed in the late morning, so I switched it out with a new one. I went through the whole 2.5 hour warm up, attempted to calibrate and it didn’t accept the calibration. So I waited a bit and tried to calibrate again and it didn’t accept it again. Unfortunately, if a sensor fails to calibrate two times in a row, it rejects it and you have to start over. So I changed my sensor, yet again and waited another 2.5 hours for it to warm up before it was back online. The only positive is Medtronic is replacing the failed sensor for free. Those things are too expensive to not get the full 7 days out of one.

***I’ll often say to Marty, “I don’t feel like being a ‘good diabetic’ today.” or “Look at me being a ‘good diabetic’ over here” when I’m doing something I’m supposed to do but don’t really feel like doing in the moment. I’m always glad I did whatever I was supposed to do but I’ll admit there is an occasional temptation to delay a blood test, etc. We’re all human, right?

****Days like today make me feel confident that we can figure out and master diabetes. Sometimes our blood sugar will do crazy things but there is always a reason. We just need to figure out the reason, learn and then adapt! Everything is a learning experience!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

5/18/2020-Run + Yoga

Outdoor Run

+ Stretch

  • 5:39 am, BG: 93, Start run, 2g carb
    • 5:54 am, BG: 87, 2g carb
  • 6:10 am, BG: 85, End run
  • 6:15 am, BG: 91, 0.6 U correction, Exit automode
  • Roll out calves
  • 6:39 am, BG: 89, 30 mins post run
  • 6:48 am, BG: 95, Start yoga
  • 7:07 am, BG: 96, End yoga
  • Epsom salt bath & Shower
  • 7:34 am, BG: 80, ~30 Minutes Post Workout

This morning, we just did a quick shake out and I took the new pair of shoes out for another spin to continue to break them in a bit. Everything was a little sore after my workout yesterday, another strength workout designed by Keith* and my lower legs are still not bouncing back quite as quickly as I would have hoped. I did get in some extra stretching, yoga** and mobility work yesterday and this morning. I’m also upping my vegetable intake hard core today to help with recovery. I normally eat a lot of veggies anyway but in my personal experience, the more I eat, the better I recover.

My BG management worked out perfectly today! My line almost looks like a normal (non-diabetic) person! I had 2 jelly beans*** right before my run and 2 more mid-run to keep my BG from dropping low and then corrected and turned on my basal**** post-run to prevent a spike. Some days you get lucky and time everything just right! Also some days, you’re slow as molasses (you can see the embarrassing garmin stats below). Gotta take the wins where you can and just keep working on everything else! 🙂

*Feel free to hit him up on facebook if you’re looking for customized workouts to help you reach your goals. My killer workout yesterday included:

Neutral full thrusters, Snatches, Good mornings to tricep kick back, Curtsy lunge to bicep curls, Single leg dead lift to high row, Reverse lunge with torso rotation, ISO squat mini band front raises, Inch worms to palms to elbows, Power step-up with kettle bell shoulder press, Leg raise to toe reach, and Spiderman crunch to plank torso rolls….and burpees. LOTS of burpees!

**Sticking with the same Rachel Meyer video. Check it out here if you like.

***Normally, I don’t fuel with jelly beans but my coworkers sent me some in the mail with a note saying they’ve missed me “in the office”. They’re the best!! I was originally just going to use them for emergency food but at 1 g of carb per bean, they work well for micro dosing on a run. They may not be the healthiest option but it sure is fun being surprised at which Jelly Belly flavor you end up with mid workout!

****Automode targets 120 for blood sugar so if you’re below that and steady, it backs off the basal. That meant I had to put it in manual mode this morning in order to get it to deliver my normal basal insulin.

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

T1 Diabetes Myths

“There will be a cure in the next 5 years!”

Most diabetics have heard some version of this. When I was first diagnosed, I was told “There will be a cure in your lifetime”. However, if you hang around the T1 community long enough, you’ll find doctors have been telling us this since the 1980’s or longer. That doesn’t mean there won’t be a cure one day, just perhaps we shouldn’t attach a specific timeline to it unless we’re 100% sure. 

There are “free foods”

This and other similar myths like, “Vegetables don’t have carbs”, “<10 g carb servings are free carbohydrates that don’t require bolus” can be particularly dangerous. Personally, I can see the effect of 1 g of carb on my BGs and even 0 carb food will affect blood sugar in some way. 

“You can eat whatever you want as long as you dose for it”

It’s true that you can keep normal blood sugar levels no matter what you eat, if you learn to dose correctly for it. That doesn’t mean you can eat whatever you want and still be healthy. Foods that are unhealthy for normal people are still unhealthy for diabetics, even if we can keep blood sugars steady and in range. Proper insulin dosing is NOT a license to eat all of the chips, candy, cheese, [insert your favorite unhealthy food here], etc. that you want.

“You will be cured with…”

This myth typically comes in the form of “advice” given by non-diabetics who will tell you their aunt’s second cousin cured themselves with diet, exercise, cinnamon, apple cider vinegar, etc. None of these things will cause your pancreas to start producing insulin again, and therefore will not cure your T1.

“Change your lancet after every finger stick”

I don’t know a single diabetic who does this. This doesn’t mean you never have to change it, as they will get dull eventually but you can absolutely get more than one use out of it without doing any harm to yourself. Similarly, I’ve been able to extend my sensors longer than the recommended 7 days (I believe other models are recommended up to 14 days but my longest was 21 days with the Guardian) without problems. Check out the diabetes support groups to learn how to do this if you’re interested since I’m not intending to play doctor on the internet.  

Timing myths like..

“You have to eat everything you bolus for in 30 minutes”, “Don’t stack insulin”, “Don’t correct a high until 3 or 4 hours later”, etc. Some of these things may help to keep you safe early on but can often actually lead to high blood sugars. As you learn how to manage your diabetes more effectively, you can throw some of these timing rules out the window and have much better control because of it. Check out my Tips & Tricks page for more information on this.

Photo Credit: Joe Longo

What are your favorite T1 myths? Let me know in the comments!

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Did I use an abbreviation or term you haven’t heard before? Check out my post on T1 & Athletic Lingo!

The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

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