So how do you make money?

Something you all probably don’t know about me is that I’m a closet personal finance nerd. I love geeking out on all things money and one of my favorite personal finance podcasts is Stacking Benjamins (don’t worry, it’s highly entertaining and you won’t learn anything!). When people call in there and ask about questions to ask when interviewing/evaluating potential financial advisors*, one they always recommend is…

“So, how do you get paid?”

In other words, “What’s your motivation?” or “What are you trying to sell me?”. I mean everyone needs to live and therefore earn a living, right? When I originally started this blog, WordPress made it super easy to turn on ad revenue, so I figured why not, all websites and blogs have them, right**? Then I saw this awesome post from Scott, the host of the Juicebox podcast (seriously, check out the Pro Tip series. It’s life changing!). 

It got me thinking about why I started blogging in the first place. When I was diagnosed with T1D, one of my first thoughts was, “I have to get back to running.” It took me a long time to find out that there were good T1 athlete resources out there. Most of what I learned initially was through self-experimentation and trial/error. Let me tell you, there were a lot of errors!

Even now, looking around, there is a lot of really good general information and rules of thumb for how to workout and keep blood sugar normal. However, the way my mind works, I want to see it in practice in real life. I’m not sure if anyone else is doing this but if so, I haven’t found them yet. So I’m offering up myself as that example for you all, because that is what I wanted when I was diagnosed (to see the “how” in practice). I don’t have it all figured out but hopefully you can learn from my mistakes, as I make them, right along with me. If I find good resources that help me, I’ll share them here in the hopes that they might help you too! 

Since that is my “mission” I’ve also realized that my mission is NOT to earn revenue from this blog. Since I have come to that conclusion, I’m removing the ads. They’re bullshit anyway and personally I hate seeing ads when I’m just trying to learn something (or anytime really). 

So all of that being said, you are probably still wondering how I make my money. Well, I work full time in human resources and I also make a little bit from my “side gig” as a licensed sports massage therapist***. In short, I don’t make money from this blog. I just hope that all of the time, effort and money that I spend on it (yes, there are some costs) allow it to become a helpful resource for someone****.

So from here on out, you won’t see ads here and if you see me talking about a product or resource you can know that it is because I’ve found them to be helpful and I’m not being paid to promote them. 

Also, if you know something that I’m missing or have a suggestion, feel free to reach out to me on social media and let me know. Again, I’m not claiming to be an expert but hopefully you’ll find that I’m pretty good at weeding through the bull and finding a few nuggets of useful information worth sharing.

* More on this here if you’re interested. 

**Even my favorite blog, https://www.mrmoneymustache.com has them. (I promise I’m not trying to convert you all into money nerds too).

***This is why I know a little bit about anatomy and kinesiology. Living with a personal trainer helps too!

****And it is quite possible that someone will actually just be me! 😉

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

6/28/2020-HIIT

Lower Body

+ Abs

  • 7:57 am, BG: 100, Start Workout
    • 2 mile run
    • 50 Kettlebell swings
    • 50 Sandbag walking lunges
  • 8:21 am, BG: 120, 0.2 U Correction
    • 25 TRX Pike to knee tucks
    • 1 mile run
  • 8:50 am, BG: 131, 1.0 U Correction
    • 25 Kettlebell swings
    • 25 Sandbag walking lunges
    • 15 TRX Pike to knee tucks
    • 0.5 mile run
    • 15 Kettlebell swings
    • 15 Sandbag walking lunges
    • 10 TRX Pike to knee tucks
    • 0.5 mile run
    • 1 Rep push up challenge, 90 seconds
    • 0.5 mile run
  • 9:13 am, BG: 178, 1.3 U Correction & Pre-bolus
    • 0.3 mile walk
  • 9:23 am, BG: 175, End Workout
  • 9:50 am, BG: 135, 30 Minutes Post Workout

Today I pulled from a few different workouts, picked Marty’s brain and made this one up. I wanted some legs, abs and running incorporated. It was a good one and it was hot outside so the running and lunges were brutal! If you look at the photo above, you may notice that I did some extra running and walking today that I hadn’t originally planned at the beginning of my workout. That was 100% blood sugar related today.

Speaking of blood sugar, if you look at the first pump picture you can see one of the challenging things with automode. Last night we had guests over (masked and socially distanced) and I had three alcoholic beverages (with about 6g carb total) in the evening. Alcohol can lower blood sugar for up to 24 hours so a workout after a night of drinking can be a bit tricky. You can see my nice steady 70-100 overnight line and you can also see that my pump (targeting a BG of 120) didn’t give me any basal insulin for hours. On one hand I didn’t go low but the lack of basal combined with the dawn phenomenon was no match for the cardio included in my workout today.

I didn’t eat anything during my workout but my blood sugar steadily rose throughout today. So much so that I gave myself a few corrections and added in some extra running and walking. I started off pretty conservatively with my corrections because it was early in the workout and I was at a good number although trending up. When I was further into my workout, I noticed my BGs were still rising quickly and I was planning on 10g of carbs for breakfast so I did a more aggressive correction. Then towards the end of my workout when I realized that wasn’t going to be enough, I added in a mile of running and a 0.3 walk with the pup and corrected again and added a bit extra to pre-bolus breakfast. You can see in the last pump picture that it worked pretty well.

I honestly hate how I feel when my BGs are that high but as long as they aren’t elevated for a long period of time, I don’t stress about it. Just adjust, correct and keep it moving!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

Cheesy Garlic Biscuits

Low Carb Biscuits

(Or “muffins” if you’re talking to Marty)

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 c Almond Flour
  • 1 TBSP Baking powder
  • 1 TBSP Garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • 2 Large Eggs
  • 1/2 c Two Good 2g yogurt
  • 4 TBSP Margarine/Butter, melted and cooled
  • 1/2 c Cheddar Cheese, shredded

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F and lightly grease a muffin pan.
  2. In a large bowl, combine almond flour, baking powder, garlic powder, and salt
  3. In a separate small bowl, mix together the eggs, yogurt and butter. Add the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and combine.
  4. Mix in the cheddar cheese until completely incorporated. The batter will be thick.
  5. Scoop batter into the muffin tin, about 1/4 c of batter in each until all batter is used. If desired, you can top the batter with a little more garlic and cheese. Firmly tap the pan on the counter so the dough settles into the muffin mold.
  6. Bake for 10-12 minutes, until an inserted toothpick comes out clean and tops are golden.
  7. Allow the biscuits to cool slightly before serving or cool completely and store for later. Enjoy!

Notes:

You can also cut them in half horizontally and use them to make sliders. I’ve used them with chicken/pork BBQ and breakfast sandwiches. Feel free to use your imagination! Also, pro-tip when it comes to cheese, always shred it yourself! It is a bit more work but tastes so much better!

Nutrition:

1 biscuit has roughly 140 calories, 3.8g carbs, 12g fat and 6g protein. This is an estimate and based off my entry of the ingredients into My Fitness Pal.

Looking for more recipes? Check out my T1 Recipe page here!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

6/25/2020-Strength

Legs + Back + Abs

  • 6:31 am, BG: 126, Start strength
    • Warm up
      • 0.5 mile run
      • 50 jumping jacks
      • 0.5 mile run
    • Block 1: all exercises 3 x through
      • 1 min Sandbag back squat
      • 1 min Sumo Squat to high raise w/ kettlebell
      • 30 secs Jump lunges
    • Block 2: all exercises 3 x through
      • 1 min Seated row w/ resistance band
      • 1 min TRX T & Y
      • 5 Pull ups
    • Block 3: all exercises 3 x through
      • 1 min Stir the pot
      • 1 min Reverse crunch
      • 1 min Palms to elbows
  • 7:20 am, BG: 118, End strength, Automode exit
  • 7:38 am, BG: 120, 1 U correction
  • 7:50 am, BG: 151, Start walk
  • 8:05 am, BG: 152, End Walk
  • 8:35 am, BG: 122, 30 mins post workout, Start automode

Today Marty made me a strength workout. It was a good one that I’m sure I’ll be feeling tomorrow! The workout itself was pretty uneventful and my BG management seemed to be going well without any food or adjustments. After the workout, I took it out of automode to get my basal going again and since I was still trending down, I didn’t make any corrections. I was planning a low carb/high protein breakfast so I didn’t want to bolus too early for that*.

At 7:38, I saw my BGs starting to trend up so I gave myself a unit to prevent a post workout spike and have a bit more insulin flowing for breakfast. Then, about 30 mins after my workout, BGs started to climb and fast! Since my insulin wouldn’t be kicking in until about 8:08 (30 mins after injection), I decided to take Miles for a quick walk to stop the spike in it’s tracks. Marty, the saint that he is, tagged along too. “When that BG number reads it’s time to put in the work, that means it’s time to work…NO EXCEPTIONS.” By the time we finished our walk, the insulin was kicking in and my numbers started to steadily come back to where I like them and I was ready for breakfast!

*Usually I pre-bolus for carbs but bolus for protein/fat while I eat or just after.

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

Quarterly Diabetes Tracking 3/31/2020-6/20/2020

Disclaimer: I know there is some controversy regarding sharing your medical information/A1c online. In the relatively short time that I’ve been diabetic, I’ve been able to get pretty decent control over my blood sugar and A1c. Since I’m showing you all how I control my BGs during my workouts, I figure it’s only fair to also show you my big picture results for how I’m doing overall when I get my quarterly blood work done. I’m sure that some quarters will be better than others, just like some days are better than others but I believe tracking this information has allowed me to have better control. I hope that by sharing this information and allowing others to follow my data, it may inspire others to track and figure out what works for them as well. 

To be clear, I am NOT saying, do what I do and your problems will be solved*. I AM saying track and experiment and figure out what works for you. I think Chris Ruden (he is a T1 beast!) puts it perfectly in episode #201 of the Juicebox Podcast:

“There is no universal fix for an individual problem.” –Chris Ruden

With all of that said, here is my data for the 3/31/2020-6/20/2020 time frame:

HbA1c = 5.6%

(My first diabetic A1c that is in NORMAL range!!!!)

For reference: Normal (not diabetic) is 4-5.7%, Pre-diabetic is 5.7-6.4% and Diabetic is 6.5% or higher. Most endocrinologists recommend their T1 patients try to stay under 7% and when I was diagnosed, my HbA1c was 11% (Yikes!).

Blood work (personal information is redacted)

Time in Range (TIR) = 93%

Since many now consider time in range to be more important than HbA1c, I wanted to include that as well. You can achieve a “great” HbA1c number by having a lot of hypoglycemic incidents, which is actually quite dangerous. The real goal is to get as close to a normal HbA1c while avoiding hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). This is why many who have a CGM (like me) focus more on TIR. This quarter, according to my sensor, I was in target range for 93% of the time, and never below 50 or above 250.

I was ecstatic with my numbers this quarter and so was my endo. The first thing she asked when she saw my A1c was if I was having a lot of lows but then when she saw my CGM time in range she was thrilled. She told me to “keep doing what I’m doing.” I’ll take it! It’s a lot of work to maintain but in my opinion, your health is worth it! Keep working at it, keep experimenting, and keep educating yourself diabuddies!

Stay strong!

#BetterThanYesterday

*Although, if you’re curious to see what has worked for me, feel free to check out my Tips & Tricks page.

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

6/23/2020- Run + Yoga

Shakeout Run

& Stretch

  • 6:10 am, BG: 118, Start run
  • 6:20 am, BG: 123, End Run, Automode exit & 0.6 U Correction
  • 6:24 am, BG: 123, Start yoga
    • 6:40 am, BG: 113, Automode start
  • 6:44 am, BG: 113, End yoga
  • 7:15 am, BG: 95, 30 Minutes Post Workout

Today I was feeling a bit sore from my workout on Monday* but I knew I needed to do something to get the blood flowing a bit. I landed on a quick shakeout run and yoga. It was great, quick and exactly what my body needed this morning. I really felt the damage I did yesterday while stretching but you have to break the muscles down in order to build them back up. It was definitely what I would consider “good pain” (as opposed to “injury pain”).

Since it was a quick workout, my BG management was pretty simple. No food during the workout at all, it was completely fueled by the dawn phenomenon. I let automode pretty much do it’s thing. I did take it out of automode** and gave myself a correction post run I also left it out of automode for a few minutes to make sure it didn’t stop my basal too soon. I had my quarterly endocrinologist visit and a bunch of meetings scheduled this morning so I put it back in automode pretty quickly since I didn’t want to have to micromanage anything this morning. That is the benefit of automode is it will keep me in pretty decent range even if I go mostly hands off.

*Monday: Bert…see photo below for workout. This was a great body weight workout if you don’t have any equipment. Also the WOD_roulette Instagram account has some fun stuff if you want to check it out!

**Since I was close to 120 (automode’s target BG) and trending down, it would have stopped my basal insulin and caused a rise after my run. It’s all about timing!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

6/20/2020-HIIT

AMRAP

As Many Rounds As Possible

  • 6:46 am, BG: 131, Walk with Miles
  • 8:06 am, BG: 103, Start Workout
    • 10 mins AMRAP
      • 5 TRX T & Y raises
      • 10 Tricep push ups
      • 15 Resistance band low rows
  • 8:25 am, BG: 122, 1.0 U Correction & Pre-bolus
    • 10 mins AMRAP
      • 100 Jumping jacks
      • 20 Jump lunges
      • 100 Toe taps on step
    • 5 mins Abs (slow movements)
      • 1 min Bicycle crunches
      • 1 min Stir the pot
      • 1 min Spiderman planks
      • 1 min Half crunch flutter kicks
      • 1 min Half crunch scissor kicks
    • Farmer Carry Progression (do not drop weights for entire set)
      • Overhead hold to fail
      • Front hold to fail
      • Standard carry to fail
  • 8:55 am, BG: 132, End Workout
  • 9:25 am, BG: 98, 30 Minutes Post Workout

This morning, was a bit unusual. Marty and I didn’t have a specific workout planned ahead of time so we took Miles for a quick walk then sat down for a cup of coffee to plan our workout. We landed on a few blocks of AMRAP and finished it with a progressive farmer’s carry*. I also took a few swings at the punching bag (that we still need a stand for) just for fun**. Quick, tough, to-the point and on with our day. We’ve got some big life changes in the very near future that have been taking up a significant amount of time (hence the fewer daily workout posts). More details on that situation in a future post!

My BG management strategy this morning was “watch and adjust”. The walk with Miles knocked the dawn phenomenon back into place. Then it started to spike as I started my work out. This could have been due to continued effect of the dawn phenomenon, coffee, the slight drop in basal that automode gave me after our walk or this intensity of the work out (or all of the above!). Since it was a short workout and I was planning on eating soon after, I gave myself a pretty significant correction to try to stay close to my ideal 70-120 target range. My timing ended up being a super close call since I hit 70 (lower end of normal) before my breakfast carbs/protein (9g carb, 31g protein) started kicking in. Overall, it was a good morning and I’m off to conquer the day. Happy Saturday Everyone!

*Totally stole this idea from Ben Greenfield for anyone that follows him. He is a bit out there (okay he is really out there) but he has some interesting thoughts on health and fitness for those who like to go down the rabbit hole.

**Punching the bag is my new way of combating a high BG. It gets my heart racing and helps with the anger that sometimes comes over me when my BGs go high. So much fun!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

Married to a T1 Athlete: Vol 1

Forward from Jen: Type 1 Diabetes doesn’t just affect those who have it, it affects that person’s whole family. With that in mind, I asked my wonderful husband, Marty, to share his perspective on life living with a diabetic spouse. The following are his thoughts on the subject. I hope you enjoy reading this as much as I did.

Married to a T1 Athlete: Vol 1 by Martin Nat

Let’s face it, being married to a competitive athlete is no easy task. Nor is being married to a T1 diabetic any easier. Hell, some will even argue the notion of marriage by itself is hard enough the way it is. So what is it like when you combine all of these humbling assets into one? To answer that in one word or even a few sentences will not give its deserved justice. Let’s just say like the seasons, things change. They change a lot, they change hard, and they change often! Sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse, and sometimes it snows in April. And its times like the latter when you need to make sure you’re on your game–prepared and ready to adapt.

No Two Workouts are the Same (nor should they be)

What’s more challenging than figuring out the right time of day to get your training in? Figuring out the right time of day to get your training in…together. This isn’t a matter of making sure you set your alarm clock to wake up a few hours early or even arranging your work day around finding time to get a few miles in. When that BG number reads it’s time to put in the work, that means it’s time to work…NO EXCEPTIONS. And when that number reads ‘sorry, you ain’t going anywhere for a while’, well, you have no choice but to obey. This could throw a wrench into any plans of a couple’s run or sweetheart swole sesh. And you know what? That’s perfectly fine. Of course it’s great to spend time with each other, especially doing something we’re both so passionate about. But it’s also good to utilize that time for yourself; your own body, your own thoughts, just you doing what not only makes you happy, but also doing something that yields positive results. Besides, it makes for a good coffee talk recap or wine talk recap later on.

Pockets = Underrated  

In the infrequent event the two of us have the chance to train together, a simple word of advice: revamp your workout wardrobe to include pockets! Nothing makes you feel more useful than being the bearer of emergency snacks! Like a magician, you’ll be pulling gummies and testing strips from areas you’d never guess were possible. However, err on the side of caution when doing post workout laundry. There’s nothing worse than a half opened pack of GU that permanently found itself all over your favorite race shirt.

Be Prepared to Drop Some Knowledge Bombs

Chances are (at least I hope) there are a few photos of you and your T1 love floating around.  And it’s only a matter of time before the elephant in the room gets addressed. Questions like ‘She runs marathons? How could she run that far without carbo loading?’ ‘What does she eat?’ and ‘How does she look that good? I thought diabetics were out of shape’ are just some of the common questions thrown around regularly. Take the time to educate someone when given the chance!

Don’t Knock It Til You Tried It. It’s Your Job & Duty to Taste Test… EVERYTHING!

It’s no new scientific breakthrough that how athletes fuel their bodies is a direct correlation to how they perform. Whether it’s a matter of habit, stubbornness, or combination of both, most athletes have their nutritional staples that they rely on to fuel them from pre work to post work out. With a T1 athlete at the helm, you are now suddenly approached with a whole new slew of recipe modifications and alternatives. Things like xanthan gum, swerve, and pizza crust made from ground chicken are just some of the things occupying my kitchen space where Eggo and Ben and Jerry once resided. Yes, nothing helps you recover better post 20 mile run than a pint of Americone Dream. At least, that’s what I used to tell myself. But when your wife has since transformed into a badass of a chef, the mere thought of a ‘real’ English muffin or ‘real’ pasta kinda turns my stomach. So much so, that I’m actually sitting here on a Sunday morning typing this while eating a muffin made from nothing other than cheese, garlic powder and almond flour, and it’s BANGIN! She’ll argue it’s a biscuit. But I’m calling it a muffin. I even felt like a five year old trying to sneak it out of the kitchen before she wakes up.

So although this disease is here for a while, we have an option. We have the option to let it control or be controlled. The competitor in my wife has not, and will not let this control her nor define who she is. If anything, it has made her stronger.

We Adapt. It’s what we do.

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

T1 High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) Training Strategy

I have personally found HITT training to be a mixed bag when it comes to blood sugar management. Some workouts can spike your blood sugar high, like a Strength/ Resistance training session. Others can drop you low, like an Endurance/Cardio session and some won’t have much of an effect at all. 

HIIT training can have many different effects on blood sugar for T1 diabetics.

For short HIIT sessions 20-60 minutes, I usually don’t do anything differently than what I would normally do in daily life. I don’t typically reduce my basal insulin or eat in advance. As always, if I’m going low, I’ll eat. If I’m going high, I’ll correct with insulin.

For HIIT sessions that are longer than 60 minutes, I usually treat more like an Endurance/Cardio session since my average heart rate is elevated for a longer period of time. I find that in these cases my BGs tend to go lower. 

For HIIT sessions that are 20 minutes or less, I treat it more like a Strength/Resistance session since they are usually really intense and are more likely to spike me high. 

The past few years, most of my HIIT style workouts have been OrangeTheory Fitness classes. I find that most of the time, I can go through their 60 minute classes without doing anything special to manage my blood sugar. Their “Endurance” days (usually long blocks on the treadmill), I’ll occasionally need carbs and their “Power” days (very short intense bursts and lots of jumping) I’ll occasionally need to correct a high. 

Occasionally, I’ll also do 400 or 800 repeats at the track or a fartlek session on the trails. In those cases, since I’m typically still running/jogging during the “recovery” periods, I usually treat this more like an Endurance/Cardio session as well. 

As with anything, do some self-experimentation to see how your BGs react to HIIT training and keep some emergency food on hand, just in case.

Since there is so much variability with HIIT training, you might be wondering, “why bother?” but there are really so many benefits to this kind of workout. In my opinion, it is beyond worth it to figure out how to manage your blood sugar during HIIT style workouts.

The main benefit of HIIT training that most people seem to talk about is the “afterburn” meaning you’re not just burning calories during your workout but…

you actually continue burning calories for hours after your workout

This is because it takes longer for your metabolism to return to it’s normal rate* when you do high intensity intervals. Another benefit is that HIIT training is an extremely efficient way to train. You can burn a lot of calories in a relatively short amount of time. If you look back through my daily workouts, compare my calorie burn for 60 mins of strength, with 60 minutes of cardio, with 60 minutes of HIIT. Most of the time, the HIIT burns the most calories, then cardio and then strength**. Last but not least,

HIIT training improves insulin sensitivity***!

This is probably the biggest benefit to us as diabetics. While most of the time, I hear about how great this is for Type 2 diabetics; for Type 1 diabetics, becoming more sensitive to insulin means we can USE LESS INJECTED INSULIN for the same amount of food!!! Even though I’m lucky to have great insurance, the fact that many can’t afford this life sustaining medication is a tragedy. If there is any way to use less insulin (helping bring down the individual cost) without harming your health (and in this case improving your health) we need to be sharing this information as much as possible.

Most T1s I talk to are shocked when I tell them my Total Daily Dose (TDD, including all basal and bolus insulin) is typically around 20 units. That’s it, 20 units per day to keep my blood sugar within healthy range. I firmly believe that my “super sensitivity” to insulin is due in large part to the fact that I work out regularly and consistently**** and include HIIT as part of my training program. 

Feeling inspired to give HIIT a try? The OTF YouTube channel has free home workout HIIT style videos.

*As opposed to moderate intensity cardio, for example.

**Of course, there are other benefits to cardio and strength training so don’t just write those off!

***All forms of exercise can do this but HIIT training is particularly good at this!

****I also use Time Restricted Feeding (TRF) and Intermittent Fasting (IF). IF has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity as well.  

Additional Reading (for nerds like me!):

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

6/12/2020- Run

Mental Health Run

5k

  • 6:12 am, BG: 126, Start run
    • 6:30 am, BG: 132, Automode exit
  • 6:42 am, BG: 126, End run, 0.5 U correction
  • 7:12 am, BG: 108, 30 Minutes Post Workout

Today was supposed to be a rest day for me because I had some tough workouts on Wednesday* and Thursday** this week but when I woke up this morning, my mind was already racing a million miles a minute. Running is my favorite tool to fix a busy mind so instead of resting, I went out for an easy solo run to clear my head. I didn’t look at my watch or worry about pace and it was glorious. I felt so much better by the time I got back home. After my run, I did my morning meditation as well and after that I felt like a whole new woman, ready to take on the day!

Luckily, my blood sugar cooperated this morning! No reduced basal, no carbs, just 100% fueled by the dawn phenomenon. I actually took my pump out of automode part of the way through my run to get my basal insulin flowing again*** to avoid the post workout spike and then gave myself a small correction right after the run. It worked perfectly and my blood sugar was super steady all morning! Happy Friday!

*Wednesday: 1 minute Bodyweight Squats, 1 minute Plank Walkout w/ Push up, 5 Push ups w/ Resistance Band, 10 Tricep Dips, 5 Push ups w/ Resistance Band, 10 Tricep Dips, 5 Push ups w/ Resistance Band, 10 Dumbbell Overhead Press, 5 Push ups w/ Resistance Band, 10 Dumbbell Overhead Press, 1 Rep Push up Challenge – 1 push up – 1 min 20 secs (40 sec down, 40 seconds back up), 5 Pull ups, 10 TRX Reverse Fly, 5 Pull ups, 10 TRX Reverse Fly, 5 Pull ups, 10 Resistance Band Pull Apart, 5 Pull ups, 10 Resistance Band Pull Apart, 1 min ISO hold pull up, 1 min Plank w/ Arms on Stability Ball, 1 min Crunches, 1 min Plank w/ Arms on Stability Ball, 1 min Crunches, 1 min Plank w/ Arms on Stability Ball, & 1 min Hollow Hold

**Thursday: Running – 1 mile warm up, 5 x 30 sec Hard/30 sec Easy, 5 x 60 sec Hard/60 sec Easy, 5 x 30 sec Hard/30 sec Easy & 0.5 mile cool down.

***Since I was close to 120 (automode’s target BG) and trending down, it would have stopped my basal insulin and caused a rise after my run. It’s all about timing!

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The content on this site is not intended to be medical advice. Always consult your doctor before beginning a fitness regimen or adjusting your diabetes management strategy.

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